Archive for July, 2015

LRKC Pet Oxygen Mask Fund

Monday, July 6th, 2015

The Lakes Region Kennel Club Pet Oxygen Mask Fund was started in 2007. The purpose of this fund is to purchase resuscitation masks that are specially designed to use on animals. These mask kits are presented as a donation to local emergency and rescue departments to aid in the resuscitation of animals that have been trapped in burning buildings and suffering from smoke inhalation. Our goal is to supply the entire state of New Hampshire.

 
People-sized masks don’t properly fit dogs and cats. So firefighters must try to revive pets with “mouth-to-snout” breathing or by waving a regular oxygen mask under the animal’s nose. Pet-sized masks, however, are the most effective way of delivering life-saving oxygen. And more departments are getting them, with one in three American households now having pets.

 
Firefighters and other rescue personnel often find that human beings aren’t the only accident victims. Like their human owners, pets also are injured or die in house fires, car crashes or falls. When there is a house fire, although rescuing people is top priority, firefighters often take the risk of bringing out pets too. After all, pets are an integral part of the family, and many people treat them as their own kids. Losing a pet in a fire can add to the trauma of a family already having to deal with the fallout of the damage caused by it.

 
Rescue personnel have been using oxygen masks meant for humans to resuscitate pets, but since they do not fit well on the faces of the animals, they often do not work. In fact, without special masks for animals, rescue personnel have often been forced to try out novel ways to revive animals that may have been affected by smoke inhalation or carbon monoxide poisoning. For instance, there was the case of an innovative firefighter who created a makeshift oxygen mask by poking a hole into a Styrofoam cup and inserting the air hose into one end. Some paramedics have tried placing the oxygen hose right next to the affected animal’s snout. These attempts are generally not effective. Some rescuers have even resorted to ‘mouth-to-snout’ resuscitation.

 
The trouble about resuscitating animals, especially big ones like St. Bernards or Great Danes, which have inhaled large amounts of poisonous gases in a fire, is that unless they are given a large and concentrated dosage of oxygen, resuscitation efforts are generally not effective.

 

 

However, pets now have higher chances of recovering from the effects of being caught in a fire. A special kind of oxygen mask which has long been used by veterinary doctors to deliver gas anesthesia and oxygen to pet animals, has been incorporated by fire departments across the country. The following video shows the use of a pet oxygen mask to revive a dog rescued from a fire.

 

 

LRKC Scholarship Recipients

Monday, July 6th, 2015

 

                LAKES REGION KENNEL CLUB ANNUAL SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS

 

 Organized in 1970 by Doris H. Phillips – to show appreciation for our Veterinarians and to encourage our New Hampshire

students aspiring to a degree in Veterinary Medicine.

Awarded to a N.H. pre-veterinary upperclassman, Dept. of Animal Sciences, University of N.H.

YEAR

NAME

TOWN

AWARD

Vet
School

1971

Jolyon Johnson

Wendell

$350

Cornell

1972

Michael E. Maki

Greenville

$550

Ohio

1973

Michael E. Maki

New Ipswich

$750

Ohio

1974

Heidi Langendoen

Nashua

$750

Ohio

1975

Laurie Stewart

Exeter

$750

Pennsylvania

1976

-no eligible applicant-

 

 

 

1977

Eric Carlson

Bristol

$750

Ohio

1978

Cynthia Hayden

Mr. Vernon

$750

Ohio

1979

Richard Linnehan

Pelham

$750

Ohio

1980

Denise Albert

Portsmouth

$750

Minnesota

1981

Denise Albert

Durham

$750

Minnesota

1982

Michelle Bishop

Gilmanton

$750

Ohio

1983

Michelle Bishop

Gilmanton

$750

Ohio

1984

Laura Barr

Salem

$750

Changed to research

1985

Deborah Kelloway

Wolfeboro

$750

Ohio

1986

Lori Lynn Hayes

Keene

$1,000

Changed to research

1987

Deborah Kelloway

Wolfefboro

$1,000

Ohio

Award reorganized in 1988 – to be awarded to a N.H. graduating Senior accepted at and entering a College of Veterinary Medicine

YEAR

NAME

TOWN

AWARD

Vet
School

1988

Pierre Giroux

Colebrook

$1,000

Ohio

1989

Danya Linehan

Concord

$1,000

Ohio

1990

Matthew Mason

Tilton

$1,000

Ohio

1991

Dianne (Subler) Carey

Nashua

$1,000

Ohio

1992

Roberta (Kilmon) Lillich

Northwood

$1,000

Ohio

1993

Yvette LaHaye

Portsmouth

$1,000

Tennessee

Award reorganized in 1994 – to include previous graduates of U.N.H. accepted at and entering a College of Veterinary Medicine

YEAR

NAME

TOWN

AWARD

Vet
School

1994

Elizabeth Edmunds

New London

$1,000

Cornell

1995

Elizabeth Webster

Derry

$1,000

Michigan

1996

Sarah Proctor

Litchfield

$1,000

Cornell

1997

Andrew Dunn

Enfield

$1,000

Ohio

1998

“Book
Awards” to Sarah Proctor & Andrew Dunn

 

$670.07

 

1999

“Book Awards” to Sarah Proctor & Andrew Dunn

 

$1,494.21

 

2000

Amy (Snedaker) Martins

Durham

$1,500

Pennsylvania

2001

Alyssa (Moyer)
Bertrand

Lincoln

$2,000

North Carolina

2002

Nicole Provencher

Concord

$2,000

Cornell

2003

Cheryl Donnell

Derry

$2,000

Ohio

2004

Carie Weismantel

Rochester

$2,000

Minnesota

2005

Stephanie (Langone) Bramhall

Lebanon

$2,000

Glasgow

2006

Krista Gazzola

Deerfield

$1,000

Mississippi

2007

Patrick Connor

Newbury

$2,000

Florida

2008

Sean Greenlaw

Manchester

$2,000

Mississippi

2009

Book Awards” to our 2005, 2006, 2007 & 2008 recipients

 

$1,994

 

2010

Nikki Mazzaschi

Laconia

$2,000

Tufts University